HIV MONTHLY. OCTOBER 2017

HIV

 

MONTHLY
OCTOBER 2017

 

 

 

TOP STORY

PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV & ON ART CANNOT TRANSMIT HIV AFFIRMS CDC

 

 

 

 

 

 

INNOVATION: FOCUS ON HIV:
6 MOMBASA FIGHTS 7 US AFFIRMS ITS

HIV & HEROIN COMMITMENT

ADDICTION TO THE GLOBAL

FIGHT AGAINST HIV

AND AIDS

1 HIV MONTHLY – OCTOBER 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Knowing your HIV status is the initial step in combating the spread of HIV and AIDS.

#JijueJipange

 

2 HIV MONTHLY – OCTOBER 2017

MESSAGE FROM THE CEO

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Readers,

This is our inaugural edition of the HIV Monthly. While we have previously published the Maisha Bulletin to keep you updated on the news stories and events taking place in the HIV response in Kenya, you have times and again requested that the Bulletin be more outward-looking and therefore incorporate events and developments from around the country as well from the international arena. This publication is therefore a response to that request.

In this particular edition, the confirmation by Centre for Disease Control (CDC) that people living with HIV and on ART, who have achieved viral suppression cannot transmit the virus to their sexual partners, serves as our lead story. The Head Technical at the NACC has helped breakdown what this particular confirmation by CDC means in Kenya’s HIV response. We have also highlighted the national HIV stock-taking meeting that occurred in the month

of October and the innovative ways in which the County of Mombasa is fighting HIV and heroin addiction among people who inject drugs and are living with HIV. In the international arena, we’ve shared some of the key proposals on how to get to zero as highlighted during the 72nd UN General Assembly. The commitment by the USA to the global fight against HIV and AIDS concludes the list of stories in this particular edition.

The HIV Monthly is produced for the national response and such, I highly encourage all of you to submit your stories and articles to communication@ nacc.or.ke for consideration, I am sure that by so doing, we shall together publish a robust bulletin that helps push both the HIV agenda and informs HIV conversations.

Happy reading.

Dr. Nduku Kilonzo

3 HIV MONTHLY – OCTOBER 2017

 

CONTENTS

4 TOP STORY:
PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV & ON
ART cannot transmit HIV Affirms CDC
5 EYES ON HIV:
KENYA HOLDS HIV PREVENTION STOCK-
TAKING MEETING
6 MOMBASAINNOVATION: FIGHTS HIV & HEROIN ADDICTION
7 EYES ON HIV:
LESSONS FROM THE 72ND
UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY
7 FOCUSING ON HIV:
US Affirms its commitment to the
Global fight against HIV and AIDS
8 NACC NEWS:
ISO Certification puts NACC on course To
EXCELLENCE

OUR SOCIAL MEDIA EDITORIAL TEAM
@nacckenya EDITOR
John Ohaga
CONTENT/STORYLINES
@nacckenya Lead Contributor
Cyphrene Wasike

@NACC_Kenya Contributors
Steve Oyugi
Ezekiel Mwabili
nacckenya Design and Layout
Ezekiel Mwabili

TOP STORY

 

PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV & ON

ART CANNOT TRANSMIT HIV AFFIRMS CDC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After protracted debate around whether people on treatment can transmit HIV virus or not, Centre for Disease Control-CDC has

joined scores of public health agencies and more than 400 organizations from nearly 60 countries in affirming that people who are living with HIV and religiously take their medication are not dangerous to sexual partners. The CDC has declared that HIV patients cannot transmit the virus to sexual partners if they have suppressed their viral load with medication.

Locally, stakeholders have welcomed the move by CDC as the country strives to End HIV and AIDS as a public Health Threat by 2030 amid high stigma cases. National AIDS Controls Council’s Head of Technical Support Dr. Celestine Mugambi describes CDC’s affirmation as a timely move which will provide impetus to the realization of the 90:90:90 global targets. She however called on stakeholders

to ensure eradication of barriers that hinder People Living with HIV in accessing Treatment to maximize on such findings.

‘We need to create an environment where HIV testing is easily and

4 HIV MONTHLY – OCTOBER 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

readily available to all as this acts as an entry point to early initiation to treatment. New innovations like the recently launched HIV self testing are in essence then very timely. However, it is important to recognize that many People Living with HIV may not be in a position to reach an undetectable status due to limited treatment access caused by poverty, denial, stigma and discrimination and criminalization. PLHIVs must therefore be supported to access and adhere to medication so as to achieve viral suppression. Strengthening community structures and interventions to support PLHIV coupled with advocating for reduction of HIV related stigma and discrimination is key” , said Dr. Mugambi.

She further noted that despite the affirmation, correct and consistent condom use is still key to HIV prevention and must be advocated for and encouraged at all times. ‘Benefits

of condom use are not limited to prevention of HIV transmission alone. Condoms are also highly effective against preventing unintended pregnancies as well as against other STIs. Therefore condom use has far more reaching public health benefits. In spite of this affirmation by CDC, we must still

THE DIVIDEND OF REVOLUTIONARY findings in the HIV response
CAN ONLY BE HARNESSED WHEN COMMUNITIES WHO BEAR THE GREATEST DISEASE BURDEN ARE EMPOWERED.

NEPHAK C.E.O Nelson Otwoma

 

advocate for safe and responsible sexual activity and ensure that condoms are made available and accessible to all who need them especially the youth.’ Noted Dr. Mugambi.

Echoing Dr Mugambi’s sentiments, NEPHAK C.E.O Nelson Otwoma noted that the dividend of revolutionary findings in the HIV response can only be harnessed when communities who bear the greatest disease burden are empowered. Otwoma who has been on the fore front fighting for the rights of People Living with HIV in the country expressed fears that many people may misinterpret CDC affirmation and lose focus on the Combination Prevention which is the surest way of Preventing HIV and AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

‘CDC is only affirming facts that have been in the public domain. However, people need to be told that this is not a magic bullet against HIV and AIDS. We still have to emphasize on Combination Prevention.’ Said Otwoma.

He also asked stakeholders to spearhead an Undetectable=Untransmittable Campaign meant to help reduce HIV-related stigma and encourage people living with HIV to initiate and adhere to a successful treatment regimen. This he noted will help reduce stigma which continues to hamper efforts against HIV and AIDS in the country.

CDC affirmation certainly provides an avenue for advocacy against myths and taboos around HIV infection and Treatment and becomes a powerful tool in the fight against HIV stigma.

The meeting whose outputs were amongst others to: generate country and county report
card of HIV prevention as at

present position papers stating clearly their acceleration plan for HIV prevention as per the Global guidance. As a procedure the Coalition Member States are expected to hold in-country processes dubbed HIV Prevention Stock-taking meetings that bring together the various players in the HIV-Subsector to assess the progress and come up with clear strategies on how to accelerate the HIV Prevention and meet the Global targets. It is on this basis that Kenya held the National HIV Prevention stock taking meeting on October 2-3, 2017 to take stock of the HIV Prevention progress and provide an opportunity for in depth analysis of the prevention interventions for accelerating the plan.
EYES ON HIV

 

KENYA HOLDS HIV PREVENTION STOCK- TAKING MEETING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenya held the National HIV Prevention stock taking meeting on October 2-3, 2017 to take stock of the HIV Prevention progress and provide an opportunity for in depth analysis of the prevention interventions.

The number of new HIV infections in Kenya and Sub-Saharan Africa is unsustainably high, translating to
unaffordable future cost liabilities for HIV anti-retroviral treatment for Governments. The Programme Coordination Board (PCB) of

the UNAIDS Geneva, in its 39th session resolved that a Global HIV Prevention Coalition Meeting be held on October 10-11, 2017 aimed at creating Global political and programme shifts to reverse the numbers of new infections. It is worth noting that Kenya is the Principle host of the Global HIV Prevention Coalition Meeting which was initially scheduled to take place in Nairobi, Kenya but had to be relocated to Geneva due the prolonged electioneering period. During this meeting the Coalition Member States, Kenya being a member are expected to

December 2016, set country and county specific strategies for achieving 2020 targets, drawing of a technical assistance plan for the provision of coordinated technical support to counties, documentation of lessons learnt and progress report for the GPC meeting and validation of the Kenya HIV prevention accelerated plan, successfully achieved its objectives. Hosted by the National AIDS Control Council (NACC), the meeting drew its participants from the County Governments, Private Sector, Civil Society Organizations, Faith Sector and Development Partners.

In her remarks the NACC CEO Dr. Nduku Kilonzo acknowledged the positive responsiveness to this national process by the targeted sectors and entities and pointed out that the country would make commitments to the Global AIDS Monitoring Programme in six months’ time on the targets and indicators agreed on during the meeting after they are polished and refined. This will then form the body of Technical Guidance for Kenya and a subset of the Global Guidelines for HIV Prevention. She also urged the meeting to develop HIV Technical Assistance Needs Guide for the Counties with the support from Partners such as UNAIDS while at the same time strengthening Case study compilation in a form that could be disseminated.

During the high level GPC meeting in Geneva, the Global HIV Prevention Roadmap 2020 was also launched.

5 HIV MONTHLY – OCTOBER 2017

INNOVATION

 

MOMBASA FIGHTS

HIV & HEROIN ADDICTION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Mahad Hassan is a medical expert in charge of Medically Assisted Therapy (MAT) clinic in Kisauni, who is using innovative ways

Itoprovide HIV treatment to those who are living with HIV,

t is estimated that new HIV infections among key population groups (men having sex with men, sex workers, persons who inject

drugs) in Mombasa County, account for up to 44 percent of all new infections in the County, annually. According to

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ms Naema, aged 29 years old is one of the patients in Kisauni’s Medically Assisted Therapy (MAT) clinic who is on methadone and living with HIV.

the Mombasa County HIV & AIDS Strategic Plan 2016/2020, Mombasa continues to struggle with the management of the epidemic among key populations, especially persons who inject drugs, which the Plan has prioritized.

When the Maisha Bulletin team, in the company of the media, visited Mombasa County to document some of the best practices adopted by the County to manage the spread of HIV among key populations, they met Dr. Mahad Hassan, a medical expert in charge of Medically Assisted Therapy (MAT) clinic in Kisauni, who is using innovative ways to provide HIV treatment to those who are living with HIV, are addicted to heroin and have been put on a heroin rehabilitation

treatment. According to Dr. Mahad Hassan, “among 10 injecting drug users in Mombasa, 4 to 5 people have HIV”. Dr. Mahad Hassan combines the treatment of HIV and TB together with Methadone, because he realized that “most clients who are recovering from heroin addiction and are also on ARVs, were more adherent to their methadone treatment but not to the HIV medication”. To deal with the challenge, he encourages his clients who are HIV positive and on methadone treatment, to adhere to their HIV medication for them to qualify for their daily methadone doses. Methadone is a drug prescribed by doctors as a substitute for heroin to reduce or quit the use of heroin and other opiates.

The innovative combination of HIV treatment and methadone came into effect when 3 patients died of HIV and TB drug resistance while still taking methadone in Mombasa County. Currently, Dr Mahan’s clinic has 12 patients who are on combined treatment in the clinic. Dr. Mahan further revealed that there is a huge correlation between addiction to injecting drugs, and the explosion of new HIV infections among the general population

in the County. This view was supported by one of the facility’s combined treatment patients Ms. Naema who stated that unlike male addicts who may steal to raise money for heroin, women who inject drugs will engage in sex work, mostly with multiple partners, thereby exacerbating the spread of the virus.

6 HIV MONTHLY – OCTOBER 2017

Promote universal access to affordable medicines: Although historic gains have been made in lowering the prices of antiretroviral medicines, costs remain too high. Urgent steps are needed to preserve the viability of the generic pharmaceutical industry and to strengthen the ability of countries to maximize legal flexibilities to increase access to essential medicines. These reforms will require a rethinking of intellectual property regimes, a re-commitment to global solidarity and an embrace of more socially responsible roles for private enterprises.

Actively take on the uncomfortable: The UN needs to fearlessly and visibly oppose the criminalization of sex work, same-gender relations, and HIV transmission, exposure or non-disclosure. The UN must enthusiastically promote sexuality education, sexual and reproductive health and rights, and legal recognition and protections of gender identity. The UN must champion the causes of the most vulnerable, including poor households, adolescent girls and young women, migrants and prisoners.

injustice. Widespread discrimination and unjust conditions create a climate that increases vulnerability to HIV and deters the most vulnerable from seeking essential services. The global community must advance a positive, people-centred agenda that recognizes respect for human rights and a commitment
to social justice as non-negotiable, regardless of setting.
FOCUSING ON HIV

 

LESSONS FROM THE 72ND

UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY

IAS Executive Director Owen Ryan 5 point plan for WUNSecretary General on HIV and AIDS.

orld leaders converged in New York for the 72nd regular session of the United Nations General Assembly.

The meeting coming a year after the adoption of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which among other things, outlines a framework for countries, World leaders, Civil Society and partners

to fast track the process to ending HIV and AIDS as a public Health threat by 2030 as outlined in SDG 3.

International AIDS Society Director Owen Ryan outlined five points for the United Nations General Secretary to consider in leading the global body in combating HIV and AIDS.

Lead the fight against social and economic disparities: HIV risk has long been correlated with high levels of social and economic inequality. New HIV infections are increasing the fastest in middle income countries. A myriad of factors ranging from withdrawal of international health support combined with massive poor populations, means that many poor people in middle-income countries actually become more deprived of essential health and social services as their own countries develop economically.

Promote human rights and social justice as essential pillars of global progress: There’s need to address the declining space of civil society and increased human rights abuses and social

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 HIV MONTHLY – OCTOBER 2017

 

US Affirms its

 

COMMITMENT TO

the Global fight

AGAINST HIV AND

AIDS

The United States has reiterated its commitment to the fight against HIV and AIDS. The commitment was re-affirmed by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson while launching the PEPFAR Strategy for Accel-erating HIV and AIDS Epidemic Control (2017-2020) on 19th September 2017 in New York. Through The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) The U.S is the largest bilateral donor to the global HIV and AIDS response. The Strategy sets a bold course for achieving control of the HIV and AIDS epidemic in 13 high-burdened countries by the end of 2020. Kenya has the fourth highest HIV burden globally and is therefore one of the countries under focus. The com-mitment to achieve HIV control in these high burden countries will be accom-plished in partnership with and through attainment of the UNAIDS 90-90-90 framework. The strategy, anchored

on three pillars lays a framework for investing in more than 50 countries with three concrete goals. First, to maintain life-saving treatment for those already enrolled, while making essential services like testing linked to treatment more ac-cessible. Second, to provide even more services for orphans and vulnerable children – those who are immediately and permanently affected when a par-ent or caretaker is lost to this disease. Finally, to accelerate progress toward controlling the pandemic in a subset of 13 countries, which represent the most vulnerable communities to HIV and AIDS and have the potential to achieve control by 2020.

Since inception in 2004, PEPFAR has been instrumental in changing the tide against HIV and AIDS in Kenya. It has particularly played a key role in scaling up of revolutionary programs including Prevention of Mother to Child Transmis-sion, HIV Testing and Treatment as well as Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision which have had a huge impact to the HIV response in the country.

For more follow the below link…. Http://
bit.ly/2hg3sW3

NACC NEWS

 

ISO CERTIFICATION PUTS NACC ON COURSE TO EXCELLENCE

 

HIV & AIDS TERMINOLOGIES

 

• Antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) These are drugs used to treat HIV and prevent it from copying itself and spreading throughout the body. They keep the virus at low levels, improve the immune system, and reduce the likelihood of passing HIV on to someone else.

• Antiretroviral treatment (ART)
This is the treatment for HIV – made up of antiretroviral drugs. ART uses a combination of three or more antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to stop HIV from spreading throughout the body.

• CD4 count
CD4 count is a measure of the number of CD4 cells (or T-helper cells) in someone’s blood. A simple blood test can count the number of cells. CD4 cells are a type of immune system cell in the body that HIV attacks and kills over time.

 

In order to effectively deliver on her core mandates of providing a policy and a strategic framework to guide the national HIV response, mobilization and coordination

of resources, prevention of HIV transmission and care and support for those infected and affected by HIV and AIDS, the NACC continually undertakes self-assessment to review her performance and to ensure that the people-centered approach to public service, defines her operations. The institution therefore invests in ensuring that her quality procedures adhere to the global excellence standards.

This commitment has enabled the NACC attain the ISO 9001:2015 certification. With this, the NACC’s coordination role is expected to be enhanced to ensure critical HIV Services reach those who need them most. A streamlined and well-coordinated national HIV response is a panacea to the known challenges facing public health sectors across Sub-Saharan Africa. The NACC, headquartered in Nairobi, has 18 regional offices manned by Regional HIV Coordinators (RHC) to facilitate her grassroots reach and to ensure services are delivered to the grassroots where they are most required.

 

8 HIV MONTHLY – OCTOBER 2017

 

 

 

To ensure its effectiveness, efficiency and continual development, the Council has since established, implemented and is maintaining a Quality Management System, which provides a framework for measuring and improving its performance in compliance with ISO 9001:2015 requirements. As outlined in its Quality Policy, NACC strives to provide its customers with products and services of the highest possible standards, while consistently meeting and exceeding customers’ expectations of quality, reliability and excellence.

NACC’s ISO 9001:2015 journey is one that has enabled the Council to strengthen its operational systems while seeking newer and more innovative service delivery strategies. Backed by the current Strategic Plan 2015-19, the certification gives the NACC the wherewithal to ensure that its processes and functions are truly reflective of the Social pillar of Kenya’s Vision 2030 blueprint, which is anchored on creation of a just, cohesive and equitable social development in a clean and secure environment.

With the attainment of the ISO
9001:2015 the NACC joins the elite club of public sector certified institutions namely NITA, NSSF, KEMSA and KNEC.

• Post-exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) PEP is short-term treatment that must be taken within 72 hours of possible exposure to HIV, for example after unprotected sex. It stops HIV spreading throughout the body and causing an infection.

• Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)
PrEP is a daily course of antiretroviral drugs that can prevent HIV infection. It is aimed at HIV-negative people who may have an HIV-positive partner, be unable to negotiate con-dom use, or be having repeated sex without a condom. When PrEP is adhered to exactly as prescribed, it reduces the chances of HIV infection to near-zero. But if pills are missed then the risk of infection will increase sub-stantially. Read more about PrEP.

• Opportunistic infection
This is a type of infection that occurs in peo-ple with a weakened immune system (for example people living with HIV).

• Undetectable / virally suppressed
A person living with HIV is considered to have an ‘undetectable’ viral load – or to be virally suppressed – when antiretroviral treatment has brought the level of virus in their body to such low levels that blood tests cannot detect it. As long as treatment is adhered to and viral load remains unde-tectable (as monitored by a health profes-sional), they cannot transmit HIV to others and their health is not affected by HIV.

Adapted from https://www.avert.org/about-hiv-aids/glossary

Facebook Comments

Kenyan gay inmates in need of condoms to curb HIV infections

The subject of homosexuality is almost a taboo in the Kenya Society with many hoping that one day the topic will disappear into thin air and morality as many would put it will reign.

But the practice is rife in Kenya especially in the correctional facilities where men engage in sexual intercourse with fellow men, fueling the spread of HIV in the country.

V reducing new infections significantly, but there is a group that has been forgotten “the prisoners.”

Daniel Nzioka, an openly gay Kenyan, says that you can’t achieve much in the war against HIV if you exclude homosexuals from State programmes.

“How can we fight HIV we don’t include men who have sex with men?” poses Daniel.

Homosexuality among male prisoners is rife, and with unpleasant food and small inhabitable rooms the prisoners are forced to engage in the vice in exchange for preferential treatment.

Calvin Wafula, not his real name served his prison sentence at the Naivasha Maximum Prison and many inmates are forced to engage in the vice for favours such as better sanitation, food and even resting areas.

“When I was brought to the prison, I realized some of my colleagues use to get preferential treatment, good food including meat while I was fed on vegetables every day. So one night a man approached me at night, and he begun touching me but I resisted but he told me if a accept I will have get special treatment, get better food and even bedding.”

It is very difficult for a person of African descent to openly discuss homosexuality since majority condemn the act, in fact many do not believe homosexuality exists.

But Juma Nzuga who served at the Shimo la Tewa Prison in Mombasa County says prior to his arrest, he could not stand the idea of men having sex with each other but he was raped in prison and got used to it, now he says it is impossible to revert.

“I was attacked by a fellow inmate at the Shomo la Tewa Prison, he was huge. He blindfolded me, threw me to the ground and raped me over and over and that became a habit.”

Because of that, Calvin has appealed to the government to avail condoms in prisons to bring down HIV transmission rates.

“A huge percentage of new inmates in prison are raped, so the government should avail condoms in the prison one can use.”

But Deputy Director at the National Aids and STI Control Program Martin Sirengo says that is impossible, insisting that the behaviour goes against morality and even the laws of the Kenya.

“It is impossible to avail condoms in correctional facilities because as we all know in prisons male and female inmates are separated, so when you avail condoms to the prisons what are you telling the world?”

Sobie Mulindi, a former director at the National Aids Control Program says the government should ensure that each and every Kenyan has access to condoms without discriminating.

“If condoms are used correctly and consistently, they can prevent the spread of HIV so we want everyone to access condoms freely without discrimination. We are saying that condoms cannot be hidden in the toilets. We want them to be made available and accessible to everyone who needs them.”

Outside the prison walls, former inmates including gay men are stigmatized. Daniel says whenever he walks around people regroup and start whispering.

“There is a lot of violence against the gay men. We cannot access health care services. When you go to the hospital, the doctors would whisper come and see a gay man!”

Homosexuality has been outlawed in the country and those found culpable risk serving up to 14 years in prison.

The big question is, will we continue to turn a blind eye on the matter or deal with it and save lives?

Facebook Comments

Medical Assistance for Ms.Zipporah Mwangangi

On June 21st 2017 as Zipporah Mwangangi was heading home from work when she was hit by a car that had lost control resulting in serious injuries including two broken legs. Zipporah who is a human rights and community activists working for HOYMAS, was first taken to Kenyatta National Hospital, were she was turned away due to the ongoing doctors strike at the time. She was then transferred to Mercy Light Hospital in Kiambu where she was operated on and metal bars were inserted into both her legs. She stayed at the hospital for three weeks leading to a bill of Ksh. 320,000 ($3,200) which HOYMAS assured payment once the monies are raised ( HOYMAS is known to the hospital and sends many of its clients there). Zipporah then spent two weeks at her home where she developed complications mainly from her present diabetes condition that lead her back to hospital (Nairobi Women’s Hospital). She began developing gang green and she had to be operated again at Nairobi Women’s hospital were they also

conducted a realignment of the metals in her legs. She is now at Nairobi’s women’s hospital awaiting discharge which will only happen when the bill is paid. The present bill at Nairobi’s Women’s Hospital is Ksh 640,000 ($6,400).

Zipporah has been the unseen and critically lifesaving force that is often behind the scene in our ongoing struggle for the rights of sex workers in Kenya. She has been the main nurse manning the HOYMAS safe house that has housed over 736 individuals who are either gravely ill or are in need for a secure space to stay due to the threats directed at them. In 2015, HOYMAS managed to transport a badly injured gay immigrant from Kakuma who had been gang raped leading to serious life threatening internal injuries. After surgery he stayed at the safe house for 5 Months under Zipporahs watchful eye. After 7 Month the young men fully recovered and with the help of HOYMAS is now in the US where he is slowly settling in as a refugee. Zipporah has nursed over 300 men who have gone through anal surgeries one of the major health concerns that affecting gay and bisexual men in Kenya. The community has been very grateful to the work and service that Zipporah has provided it. It is now the turn of the various communities that Zipporah has supported to give her the much needed support. This includes the sex worker and LGBTI communities. HOYMAS is presently fundraising for Zipporah. The target amount is $10,000 ($9,600 for the hospital bill and $400) for her initial upkeep.

For Contribution / more information, please contact: Hoymas4@yahoo.com /communications@hoymas.or.ke

John Mathenge————– +254725608724
Hoymas Office Number — +254714781000

Facebook Comments

PREP

WHAT IS PREP?

PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis.  This is one way way for a HIV-negative person who is at risk of HIV infection to reduce their risk of becoming infected with HIV. It involves taking anti-HIV drugs on a regular basis. The pill provided for PrEP is called Truvada.

WHY TAKE PREP.?

PrEP can provide a high level of protection against HIV,more so when it is taken consistently and combined with condoms and other prevention methods.

WHO SHOULD TAKE PREP?

PrEP is recommended for people who are HIV-negative and at substantial risk for HIV infection. Such people include;

-has multiple sexual partners.

-has a history of sexual transmitted infections in the last 6 months

-is in an ongoing sexual relationship with a HIV-positive partner

-is unable to consistently use condoms with a partner of unknown or HIV positive status.

IS PREP SAFE?

The safety of the drugs being considered for PrEP,tenofovir and emtricitabine has been established through their use of treatment and in safety trials in HIV negative people.

Some people in clinical studies of PrEP has early side effects such as an upset stomach,loss of appetite and mild headaches, but these were mild and usually went away in the first month.

Any side effects observed should be reported to the health provider immediately.

HOW DOES PREP WORK?

If taken properly,PrEP blocks some of the steps that HIV uses to make copies of itself in a person’s body.

If taken daily,presence of the medicine in the blood has been shown by research to stop HIV from taking hold and spreading in the body. If you do not take PrEP every day,there may not be enough medicine in your blood to block the virus.

HOW CAN PREP BE USED EFFECTIVELY?

One pill is taken daily on a continuous basis

For maximum reduction of risk, it must be used with other effective prevention strategies including:

*correct and consistent use of condoms and water based lubricants

*getting HIV testing with partners
*screening and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases

 

THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT PREP?

-You must be tested for HIV to make sure you are HIV negative before starting PrEP

-Only people who are HIV negative should use PrEP

-If you decide to use PrEP you will need to see a health care provider every three months for HIV testing,monitoring for side effects,counselling for risk reduction and support adherence

-PrEP is most effective when used in combination with other prevention methods such as condoms.

 

Facebook Comments

HELP A MOTHER, A SISTER AND A FRIEND TO GET BACK TO WORK

Daughtie, the Director of the African Sex Worker Alliance has been living with HIV for the last 15 years, she has been sick undergoing treatment for CMV since Feb 2017 and TB since May 2017 for which she had been hospitalized for 2 months. As part of her treatment Daughtie has had to change her ARV medication and is on a regiment consisting of Abacavir, Dolutegravir and Lamivudine known as Triumeq. She has to buy this treatment as it is currently not offered to her for free.

Recently she was diagnosed with CMV Retinitis and just discovered she is losing her eye sight as a result of it. She has completely lost use of her left eye and needs urgent treatment to save her right eye.This whole treatment proposed by doctors and eye specialists from PCEA Kikuyu EYE Hospital will cost USD 5,500 consisting of four (4) eye injections into the Retina and prescription medication for a duration of 3 months including travel costs to the hospital.

Daughtie has already received a generous donation from the National AIDS and STI Program (NASCOP) for ARV Drugs, Dolutegravir and also continuing her TB treatment at Aga Khan Hospital Nairobi for the next four months

ICW is appealing for your support to help a sister in the movement through this moment to enable her get better and back to work. We ask for a donation of any amount that will be received by ICW for payment of her treatment expenses.

ICW Global office works in global policy spaces and very rarely works directly with individuals. In this circumstance ICW recognises the important work Daughtie is doing at country, regional, and global levels as a strong advocate for sex worker rights and the raising of critical issues of the intersectionality of sex workers who are living with HIV. As this fundraiser gets underway ICW is moving forward with a discussion across the global networks on how to mobilise funds for global advocates who need treatment support and have limited or no access to life saving drugs.

Remember nothing is too small to share at this time. Kindly click on the Donate button below and send your donation to ICW. Please mark your donations ‘Daughties treatment’ to enable our finance office consolidate the funds correctly.

For more information please get in touch with our Director Rebecca Matheson on globaldirector@iamicw.org or reach Daughtie directly on daughtieog@gmail.com

Kindly help us support Daughtie get back to work

Facebook Comments

NEW PEER EDUCATORS TRAINING

17991043_1150117361801092_53293162863052639_n 18010202_1150116635134498_9217283181656604759_n 18057644_1150117051801123_2730192755757568738_n

A month ago,HOYMAS through the support of FHI 360 conducted a peer education training at the Luke Hotel in Nairobi. The 5 day training saw the 20 new peer educators go through some trainings that will enable them reach,advocate and educate their peers on matters pertaining health related issues.

Some of the topics were;

-HIV/AIDS

-STIS

-ADHERANCE.

-ACCEPTANCE AND FACING STIGMA

Facebook Comments

PREP

dreamstime_s_60600463-prep

WHAT IS PREP?

PrEP stands for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis.  This is one way way for a HIV-negative person who is at risk of HIV infection to reduce their risk of becoming infected with HIV. It involves taking anti-HIV drugs on a regular basis. The pill provided for PrEP is called Truvada.

WHY TAKE PREP.?

PrEP can provide a high level of protection against HIV,more so when it is taken consistently and combined with condoms and other prevention methods.

WHO SHOULD TAKE PREP?

PrEP is recommended for people who are HIV-negative and at substantial risk for HIV infection. Such people include;

-has multiple sexual partners.

-has a history of sexual transmitted infections in the last 6 months

-is in an ongoing sexual relationship with a HIV-positive partner

-is unable to consistently use condoms with a partner of unknown or HIV positive status.

IS PREP SAFE?

The safety of the drugs being considered for PrEP,tenofovir and emtricitabine has been established through their use of treatment and in safety trials in HIV negative people.

Some people in clinical studies of PrEP has early side effects such as an upset stomach,loss of appetite and mild headaches, but these were mild and usually went away in the first month.

Any side effects observed should be reported to the health provider immediately.

HOW DOES PREP WORK?

If taken properly,PrEP blocks some of the steps that HIV uses to make copies of itself in a person’s body.

If taken daily,presence of the medicine in the blood has been shown by research to stop HIV from taking hold and spreading in the body. If you do not take PrEP every day,there may not be enough medicine in your blood to block the virus.

HOW CAN PREP BE USED EFFECTIVELY?

One pill is taken daily on a continuous basis

For maximum reduction of risk, it must be used with other effective prevention strategies including:

*correct and consistent use of condoms and water based lubricants

*getting HIV testing with partners
*screening and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases

 

THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT PREP?

-You must be tested for HIV to make sure you are HIV negative before starting PrEP

-Only people who are HIV negative should use PrEP

-If you decide to use PrEP you will need to see a health care provider every three months for HIV testing,monitoring for side effects,counselling for risk reduction and support adherence

-PrEP is most effective when used in combination with other prevention methods such as condoms.

 

Facebook Comments

MONEY LOGIC TRAININGS AT HOYMAS

Previous research conducted by VU University Amsterdam in conjuction with HOYMAS and KESWA  supported by AIDSFOND revealed that close to all economic empowerment projects carried out in Kenya targeting male and female sex workers have failed so far. The design of the  project is based on academic research with male and female sex workers in Kenya . A pilot study which was testing a new method of community-led economic empowerment was designed in and carried out in 2015 with 20 male sex workers (at HOYMAS), under the auspices of the VU University Amsterdam and executed by HOYMAS. It was highly successful since 80 % of the participants (all very hard-to-reach members of society) were able to improve their individual economies (and still are) within the pilot project period of 3months. This has enabled many of the young men to avoid risk behaviour –such as unsafe sex, improve their health situations and enhance their living conditions and that of their (extended) families. The key to success turned out to be threefold: 1) the awareness on belief systems guiding individual decision-making on money (i.e. money logics); 2) the multi-tiered and tailor-made guidance structure –instead of the common one-size fits all; and 3) long-term supervision and peer mentoring. The time has come now to scale-up this project to help 50 more male sex workers in Nairobi with improving their livelihoods, health and social positions, and enhance their spaces for constructive choice-making. This will also enable us to develop a model, not just for further expansion in Nairobi but also for duplication elsewhere in Kenya (and around the world). 10 participants from the pilot project will each act as mentor for 5 new participants, and a big part of the budget will go to a revolving loan, which circulates in phases. All this contributes to making the project cost-effective and sustainable in the long run.

The  project is a community designed and led economic empowerment program, which is based on the different money logics of the target groups, hence the name ‘Money Logics’. Money logics are the belief systems that inform all our practices that relate to earning, saving, investing and spending money. Some money logics are detrimental to economic stability and growth, others enhance these. The program trains members to understand the difference and act accordingly, it also trains them in skills needed to achieve individual life plans (broken down in annual plans), and it is organised as a mentor and peer-support project. Successful members from previous projects will guide emerging groups and these groups also act as support groups so that guidance, peer support and expert supervision create a multi-levelled, diverse and long-term but cost-effective support system for participants. It trains the target group, i.e. male sex workers in small groups of 5to create spaces of trust and openness.It gradually and steadily guides all participants to embark on different income generating activities and follow through on their own annual plans to improve their economic situations. The project is designed in such a way that all participants are supervised according to their individual needs.

The project will train, counsel and guide the participants in a long-term trajectory so that they can make tangible steps towards fulfilling their annual plans. The training is based on their particular money logics that govern their daily practices with regard to money, and it is tailor-made to match the needs, skills and guidance each individual participant requires to achieve the goals set in their long- and short-term plans.

 

 

For the last one week,Hoymas  has been offering Money Logic training to its members.The main goal of this training is to build skills,knowledge, planning personal income and planning expenditure for our community.

Some of the topics covered are;

-Dealing with expectations and pressure

-Income and expenses

Preparing a budget

-Savings

-Lending and Borrowing

-Negotiating

-Personal development plan

img_0045 img_0051 img_0055 img_9849 img_9852 img_9880

Facebook Comments